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  • Writer's pictureAqua Warehouse

How Often Should You Use a Hot Tub - Is it Possible to Overuse it?

Updated: Mar 5, 2023

When your hot tub leaves you feeling relaxed, it’s very tempting to spend as much time as possible enjoying the fun experience. Is it such a bad thing to spend lots of time in your hot tub? This question is common, especially for all new hot tub owners.


The answer to this question is - it depends. This post will examine the factors you must consider. When you’ve got all the important information you can decide how much is too much when it comes to using your hot tub.


How Often Should You Enjoy the Hot Tubbing Experience?


When you’re a new hot tub owner, luxuriating in the heat of the swirling water of your hot tub feels like an experience you never want to end. However, don’t forget that lounging in hot tubs for extended periods is not generally recommended as it raises your body temperature.

Limiting your hot tub sessions to between 15 and 30 minutes is generally recommended, especially if you like the temperature of the water at the maximum.


If you stay in your hot tub for longer than 30 minutes, you should be aware of the safety concerns. You’re increasing the risk of negative effects on your body and general well-being and should reduce the temperature of the water accordingly. Warm water is better than hot water for an extended dip or soak.


Knowing the limit of each hot tub session is all well and good, but how frequently can you repeat those sessions? Can you do two, three, or more sessions on a daily basis? Does using your hot tub daily enhance health, or should you restrict the pleasure to a few times each week?


There is clear evidence that using a hot tub every day or regularly is the best way to get the most wellness benefits from your purchase. When your hot tub sessions are part of your daily routine, apart from that recommendation, it’s all down to personal preference. Ideally, choose a time that’s convenient for your lifestyle and needs.


What are the Benefits of Regular Hot Tub Soaks?


When you start using your hot tub regularly, there are a few hot tub health benefits that you’re likely to experience. Wellness benefits include:

  • Stress and tension relief: The floating sensation of the warm water relieves any tension and stress you might be feeling and will promote relaxation.

  • Pain relief: A soak in your hot tub releases natural pain relievers that reduce soreness and aches in tired muscles.

  • Reduction in joint inflammation and enhanced mobility: Raising your body’s temperature increases blood flow and improves circulation.

  • Better-quality sleep: Soaking in a hot tub helps you relax mentally before bed, and at the same time, the buoyancy of the water helps to compress your joints.

  • Toxin removal: If you turn up the water temperature, your body will sweat out all the impurities and toxins.

  • Strengthened immune system: When you’re in your home spa, it stimulates the production of white blood cells. As they flow throughout your body's blood vessels, it helps you fight infections and disease.

What to Consider if You Use a Hot Tub Often?


If you’d like to make the most of your hot tub investment, there are some things you should consider.


Consider the Quality of the Hot Tub


If you want to get the biggest bang for your buck and be able to use your home spa for many years to come, don’t go for the cheapest model you can find.

Instead, look for a stockist with an excellent reputation, such as Aquawarehous hot tubs. Whether you meet the team in person, by visiting their warehouse or buy your hot tub online, you’re assured of a top-quality product manufactured by the finest hot tub company in the UK.


Cost of the Hot Tub


You’ll find hot tubs available for a range of different prices. Your money is better spent on a more expensive model that will last ten years or more, and you get to use it every day.

A low-cost spa might suit your budget today, but you won’t get much use out of it before it stops working in a couple of years or less.


Consider Location


If you’d like to use your hot tub every day, think carefully about where you will position it. A spot at the bottom of the backyard where you can enjoy a view of the rolling countryside might seem like an idyllic place to locate your hot tub. However, how often you use it correlates directly with its proximity to your back door.


On a chilly winter morning, what would you rather do? Trek across the lawn to your spa at the bottom of the garden, or take a few steps outside your back door. You might also want to consider locating it inside your home if there’s space available.


If you’re concerned about the noise your hot tub might make. Look at the possibility of purchasing hot tubs with a dedicated circulation pump. These circulate the water 24 hours a day without a noisy filtration cycle.

One final thing you might want to consider is how easy it is to use the hot tub. If your budget is big enough, look for hot tubs with features that make hot tub ownership easy. Plenty of models are virtually maintenance-free and require only simple water care requirements.


Can You Overuse a Hot Tub?


Is it possible to use your hot tub too much? There’s no set limit for how often you use your hot tub. The main thing is not to overuse it and to follow the recommendations we feature here.

The main factors to prevent overusing are:


Time Spent in the Hot Tub


If you’re wondering how long you should stay in your hot tub, a good rule of thumb is between 15 and 30 minutes for adults, and less for young children, depending on the water temperature.


Water Temperature


The temperature of your hot tub’s water will generally range from 36-38°C (97-100°F). The higher the water temperature, the shorter your sessions should be.

Some of the effects you may experience if you stay in hot water include:

  • Nausea

  • Headache

  • Dehydration

  • Fainting

  • Dizziness

  • Overheating

  • Dry skin

Specific Medical Conditions


Do you suffer from a health condition such as circulatory problems, diabetes, heart disease, or high blood pressure? Or take certain medications? Then you should discuss your hot tub usage with your healthcare provider. Spending time in a hot tub increases your body temperature, which could make some medical conditions worse.

Pregnant women should also seek medical advice before a daily hot tub soak.


How Often is it Safe to Use a Hot Tub?

Use it as often as you like if you follow the recommendations above. You also need to keep up with regular maintenance and cleaning.


Conclusion


So, how often should you use a hot tub? When used safely, a hot tub can be a great way to relax and unwind after a long day. As with anything else, moderation is key. Ensure you follow the safety guidelines, and, if necessary, consult a healthcare professional before using a hot tub regularly.

With these tips in mind, you can enjoy the benefits of a hot tub without risking your health. So don’t be afraid to use your hot tub as much as you want to. Just keep it clean, well-maintained, and ready for use whenever you feel like enjoying a spa experience.

Happy Soaking!


FAQs


How many times a week should you use a hot tub?


You get the overall health benefits from your hot tub use if you spend at least 15 minutes in it a few times a week.


Is it OK to use a hot tub every day?


Yes, it’s perfectly OK to use your hot tub every day. Just follow a maintenance and cleaning schedule that matches your use and keeps the water quality at its best.


How many times a day can you use a hot tub?


As long as you follow the manufacturer’s recommendations, there’s nothing wrong with using your hot tub as often as you want.


Is it OK to use my hot tub twice a day?


Absolutely. Yes, you can use your hot tub twice a day, and the more regularly you use it, the more health benefits will become apparent.

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AUTHOR

Jess Court

I'm Aqua Warehouse Groups Marketing Officer - overseeing all things news worthy in the hot tub industry, with tips and tricks that are bound to make a splash.

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